How Fossil Lemurs Got Across Oceans

Throughout time we find evidence that certain animals made it across vast oceans to other continents, seemingly by crossing the seas. In this episode we talk all about how animals can survive these strange events of accidental seafaring, and how the odds are always stacked against them.

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Discussion of cruel research methods (not ours!), the various benefits of inbreeding, and the fact that these events often led to dead monkeys.

Images From the Episode (Kinda)

References

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